Canopy Growth buying US hemp research firm Ebbu in deal worth more

first_imgSMITH FALLS, – Canopy Growth Corp. has signed a deal to buy Ebbu Inc., a Colorado-based hemp researcher, in a stock-and-cash deal worth more than $425 million.Under the agreement, Canopy will pay $25 million in cash and issue 6,221,210 shares to Ebbu.The company will also pay up to an additional $100 million if certain scientific-related milestones are achieved within two years of the deal closing.Canopy will have the option of making the milestone payments in cash, shares or a combination of cash and shares.Shares in Canopy closed Monday at $73.75, up $8.85 or 13.64 per cent on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The company says the deal will help its hemp and THC-rich cannabis genetic breeding program, as well as other parts of its business.“Beyond the technological edge this transaction provides, we are pursuing this acquisition because Canopy shares Ebbu’s core ethos of building consumer trust,” said Mark Zekulin, Canopy’s co-chief executive and president.“We collectively believe consumer trust is achieved by driving the scientific agenda needed to build predictable, repeatable outcomes and layering on brand power.”Companies in this story: (TSX:WEED)last_img read more

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Suncor plans 10 production increase for 2019 holds capex spending steady

first_imgThe production guidance came as Suncor says it is planning between $4.9 billion and $5.6 billion in capital spending next year, roughly in line with this year.The Alberta government has announced a mandatory cut to oil production which amounts to 8.7 percent of overall output in a bid to reduce a glut of oil and help boost low prices.Western Canadian crude had been trading at a steep discount to the North American benchmark prices, however, that gap has narrowed since the Alberta announcement.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) CALGARY, A.B. – Suncor Energy Inc. is planning to grow production by about 10 percent, even after Alberta’s mandatory production curtailments.The company says it expects average upstream production of 780,000 to 820,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day, up from about 730,000 boepd this year.Suncor says its guidance assumes the curtailments are in place for three months before falling to 30 percent of initial levels for the remainder of 2019, in line with the provincial announcement.last_img read more

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SCO to hold joint antiterrorism exercise in 2019

first_imgBeijing: India, Pakistan and the other members states of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) will take part in a joint anti-terrorism exercise to be held this year by the grouping. The decision to hold the joint exercise ‘Sary-Arka-Antiterror 2019’ was announced during the 34th meeting of the SCO’s Regional Anti-Terrorist Structure (RATS) council held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, Xinhua news agency reported. The SCO, in which China plays an influential role, is also comprised of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India and Pakistan. India and Pakistan were admitted into the bloc in 2017. Also Read – Squadrons which participated in Balakot air strike awarded citations on IAF Day Delegations of the competent authorities of India, Kazakhstan, China, the Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and the RATS Executive Committee attended the meeting. Chaired by Russia, the meeting also declared plans to hold the first stage of the joint border operation “Solidarity 2019-2021,” the 7th meeting of the heads of the border services, and training workshops on identifying and preventing the use of the Internet for terrorist, separatist and extremist purposes. RATS is a permanent organ of the SCO which serves to promote cooperation of member states against the three evils of terrorism, separatism and extremism. It is headquartered in Tashkent. The next meeting of the Council of the RATS SCO is scheduled to be held in Russia in September 2019.last_img read more

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Godse extremist remark Kamal Haasan secures anticipatory bail

first_imgChennai: The Madurai Bench of the Madras High Court on Monday granted anticipatory bail to actor-politician Kamal Haasan in the case filed against him for his Hindu extremist comment. Campaigning for his party Makkal Needhi Maiam’s (MNM) candidate in the bye-election for the Aravakuruchi Assembly constituency, the actor speaking about the killer of Mahatma Gandhi, said: “The first extremist of independent India was a Hindu — Nathuram Godse. It all started from there.” Haasan made the comment in a locality were Muslims lived in large numbers. His comment created a huge row nationwide and police complaints were filed in Aravakuruchi against Haasan for trying to create enimity between communities.last_img read more

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Mbappe has a great personality – Matuidi

first_imgFrance midfielder Blaise Matuidi believes international teammate Kylian Mbappe has the kind of personality ‘every great player’ requires to fulfill their potential.Matuidi insists the Paris Saint-Germain star needs his great personality to become as successful as Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi, and Zlatan Ibrahimovic.Mbappe has become one of the best attacking players in the world over the past three years and was nominated for this year’s Ballon d’Or award, having lifted three domestic trophies at club level and the World Cup in Russia, earlier this summer.Matuidi believes the former AS Monaco youngster has the self-confidence and persona to become a true great in the game.FC Barcelona, Valencia CFMatch Preview: Barcelona vs Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Is derby time in La Liga, as Barcelona welcomes Valencia to the Camp Nou Stadium tonight at 21:00 (CET).“It is his personality. It’s the player he is,” Matuidi told a news conference, according to FourFourTwo.“He is a great player; he is very talented. Every great player has a great personality. I’ve known that with Zlatan. I see that with Cristiano. Messi is also like that.”“Kylian will be a great player. He is already. He is doing big things. It’s good; we need players like him. So, I encourage him to stay like that.”last_img read more

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4th of July pet safety with Helen Woodward Animal Center

first_img KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Many family pets will run away from home this holiday weekend because of noise and confusion.Fireworks Safety:Do not bring your pets along to the fireworks displays. Most dogs do not do well with the combination of crowds, noise, and bright lights. It is best to leave your pets indoors during the fireworks shows because many pets will panic and try to escape the yard. It is important to make sure that your pets have access to their favorite safe space or find a quiet, comfortable, enclosed room where your pets can stay calm. If you are going to a fireworks display and leaving your pets at home alone, leave the radio or television on so there is some background noise. Also, it’s a good idea to have your pets microchipped. Many of the pets that run away during the fireworks will escape by slipping out of their collars or getting out of the yard. A microchip will assure that your pet is returned if it ends up at a shelter or clinic.Other Summer Safety tips:The warm weather we have been experiencing recently is also felt by our pets. Make sure they have consistent access to fresh drinking water as well as shade. Do not exercise your pet during the hottest parts of the day. Also be wary of hot asphalt and sidewalks which can burn paw pads. For pets who like to spend time outdoors remember they can also get sunburnt on exposed areas such as their belly or white patches of fur. Since most pets will just lick off sunscreen consider covering those areas with a puppy t shirt or something similar. It’s also a good idea to keep pets away from hot barbeques and grills to avoid accidents as well as not feeding off the table as we picnic during this holiday weekend Posted: July 3, 2019 4th of July pet safety with Helen Woodward Animal Center KUSI Newsroom July 3, 2019 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Skagway mayor and her mother die after hit by DC tour bus

first_imgSkagway mayor Monica Carlson. (Photo by Emily Files, KHNS – Haines)State flags will fly at half-staff New Year’s Day for Skagway Mayor Monica Carlson, 61. The mayor and her mother were struck by a bus in a crosswalk in Washington, D.C. Wednesday night.Carlson and 85-year-old Cora Louise Adams were sightseeing in Washington and staying in a downtown hotel. They toured the White House on Wednesday. That night, shortly after 9:30, they crossed Pennsylvania Avenue at 7th Street NW. That’s just north of the National Mall, about halfway between the White House and the Capitol. Police say a tour bus turning onto Pennsylvania hit them. The weather was good and the intersection is well lit, so the cause of the collision wasn’t immediately clear.“Eyre Bus, Tour & Travel wishes to express their sorrow and sympathy for the family,” said Melanie Hinton, director of communications for the American Bus Association. She said the bus company is cooperating with the police investigation.“As for details, there were no passengers on the bus at the time of the accident,” Hinton said, speaking on behalf of the bus company. “The seasoned driver has been with Eyre for 18 years.”Both Alaska senators say Mayor Carlson did not pay an official visit to their offices this week. A spokesman for Sen. Dan Sullivan says his staffers helped her get a tour of the White House, as they do for other visiting Alaskans who apply in advance.Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she met Carlson one busy summer day in Skagway.“Here she is on a Saturday afternoon, standing up in her office,” Murkowski recalled. “It was one of those conversations where we talked about all the business of the city and the issues and the concerns while she’s juggling multiple balls.”They bonded over a shared political experience: Carlson pointed out that she was elected as a write-in on the ballot, just as Murkowski was in 2010. Murkowski says she was impressed with Carlson’s dedication.“Skagway, even as a small town, has some issues that divide them. She was really working very, very hard to knit together the differing views in a small community,” Murkowski said. “Everybody has to live with one another and work with one another. And she just seemed so, so perfectly suited to do just that. So our hearts are very heavy for the people of Skagway.”Carlson and Adams are the 11th and 12th pedestrian fatalities of the year for Washington, according to an unofficial list compiled by traffic safety advocates.The Washington Post reports that two women died at the same intersection in 2007. They were also hit by a bus. The driver in that case was convicted of negligent homicide.last_img read more

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Bus kills easybike driver in Magura

first_imgMap of MaguraAn easy-bike driver died in a road accident in Arpara area on Magura-Jessore road on Wednesday night, reports UNB.The deceased is Kitab Ali, 32, son of Sobed Ali of Arpara area.A speeding bus ran over Kitab around 10 pm when he fell down from the easy-bike after being hit by the bus, leaving him dead on the spot, said Rabiul Islam, officer-in-charge of Shalikha police station.On information, police recovered the body and sent it to Magura Hospital morgue.A case was filed.last_img

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2016 Under Scrutiny A Timeline Of Russia Connections

first_imgFormer Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort (right), leaves U.S. District Court after pleading not guilty to federal charges, including “conspiracy against the United States,” on Monday in Washington, D.C.The first charges have been filed in the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the U.S. election, and the court documents help make clearer the timeline of Russia-related events that took place during the presidential campaign.Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, indicted on 12 counts unrelated to his work on the campaign, is the big name. But the guilty plea of an obscure foreign policy adviser named George Papadopoulos has proven more revealing when it comes to alleged connections between the Trump campaign and Russia. Court documents filed Monday add new information to a timeline of events that now involves multiple known contacts between people associated with the Trump campaign and Russian actors.The order and nature of events during the spring and summer of 2016 became increasingly relevant in June, with revelations about a meeting between Russian nationals, Donald Trump Jr., then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law.Here’s a timeline of key Russia-related 2016 events:2006-2016: According to a 12-count indictment unsealed on Oct. 30, 2017, “from approximately 2006 through at least 2016, Manafort and Gates laundered money through scores of United States and foreign corporations, partnerships and bank accounts.” Paul Manafort served on the Trump campaign from March 2016 through August 2016, serving as campaign chairman from May until August. Richard Gates is a former business partner of Manafort’s who followed him to the Trump campaign as his deputy. After Manafort was ousted from the campaign, Gates moved to the Republican National Committee to work out legal agreements with Trump’s campaign and ultimately served on Trump’s inaugural committee.“Early March” 2016: According to Justice Department documents, George Papadopoulos learns he will be a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign.March 14, 2016: Papadopoulos, while traveling in Italy, meets a London-based professor. Per a special counsel filing, “initially, the professor seemed uninterested” in him. “However, after defendant Papadopoulos informed the professor about joining the campaign, the professor appeared to take great interest” in him. The professor had “claimed to have substantial connections with Russian government officials,” which according to the filing, Papadopoulos thought would help his standing as a foreign policy adviser for the campaign. (Editor’s note: Many of the dates pertaining to Papadopoulos are described as “on or about” that date in the legal documents. We have omitted that caveat for clarity. See the original Justice Department language here.)March 19, 2016: Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta reportedly receives a phishing email, which led to the theft of thousands of his emails going back years, including embarrassing campaign correspondence. Those emails were then posted by Wikileaks in batches beginning in early October and continuing right through the election. The US intelligence community concluded Russia’s intelligence agency, the GRU, was responsible for the hacking.March 21, 2016: Trump cites Papadopoulos as a foreign policy adviser in Washington Post editorial board meeting. Carter Page is also mentioned. Trump told the Post:“Well, I hadn’t thought of doing it, but if you want I can give you some of the names… Walid Phares, who you probably know, PhD, adviser to the House of Representatives caucus, and counter-terrorism expert; Carter Page, PhD; George Papadopoulos, he’s an energy and oil consultant, excellent guy; the Honorable Joe Schmitz, [former] inspector general at the Department of Defense; [retired] Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg; and I have quite a few more. But that’s a group of some of the people that we are dealing with. We have many other people in different aspects of what we do, but that’s a representative group.”March 24, 2016: Papadopoulos meets in London with the professor, who brought with him a female Russian national introduced to him “as a relative of Russian President Vladimir Putin with connections to senior Russian government officials.” Papadopoulos then emails a “campaign supervisor” not named in court filings as well as “several members of the Campaign’s foreign policy team,” recounting his meeting with the professor, the woman whom Papadopoulos described as Putin’s niece (the filings note he later learned she was not actually related to Putin). Papadopoulos said the topic of the discussion was “to arrange a meeting between us and the Russian leadership to discuss US-Russian ties under President Trump.”March 28, 2016: Trump brings on Manafort to manage delegate operations for the campaign.March 31: According to court filings, Papadopoulos attended a “national security meeting” in Washington, D.C., with then-candidate Trump and other foreign policy advisers for the campaign. Per the filings, when Papadopoulos introduced himself to the group, he said he had connections that could help arrange a meeting between Trump and President Putin. April 18, 2016: Around this day, Papadopoulos is introduced by email to a person in Moscow who was said to have connections to the Russian Foreign Ministry. According to court filings, Papadopoulos and this individual have multiple conversations over Skype and email about “setting ‘the groundwork’ for a ‘potential’ meeting” between the campaign and Russian officials.April 25, 2016: Papadopoulos emails an unnamed senior policy adviser to the campaign, saying, “The Russian government has an open invitation by Putin for Mr. Trump to met when he is ready []. The advantage of being in London is that these governments tend to speak a bit more openly in ‘neutral’ cities.”April 26, 2016: Papadopoulos meets with the professor in London. The professor tells Papadopoulos that he had just returned from a trip to Moscow, where he met with high-level government officials and learned that the Russians had obtained “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. “They have thousands of emails,” the professor said, according to Papadopoulos’ statements to the FBI.April 27, 2016: In a major foreign policy speech at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., Trump indicates a willingness to work with Russia and Russian President Vladimir Putin.“I believe an easing of tensions, and improved relations with Russia from a position of strength only, is possible, absolutely possible,” he said. “Common sense says this cycle, this horrible cycle of hostility must end and ideally will end soon. Good for both countries. Some say the Russians won’t be reasonable. I intend to find out.”Sergey Kislyak, then the Russian ambassador to the U.S., was sitting in the front row, according to a report by Radio Free Europe.On this same day, Papadopoulos separately emails a “senior policy advisor” and a “high-ranking” campaign official, both unnamed in legal filings. He told the adviser he had “some interesting messages coming in from Moscow about a trip when the time is right.” He told the campaign official that he had been receiving “a lot of calls” about Putin wanting to host Trump and his team.May 18, 2016: James Clapper, then the director of national intelligence, warns of some indications of cyberattacks against the 2016 presidential election. In a cyber-event at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, D.C., Clapper said “as the campaigns intensify we’ll probably have more of it.”June 2, 2016: In early June, as the primaries in both parties were winding down, Clinton turned her fire to Trump in what was widely considered one of the strongest moments of her campaign.“Now I will leave it to psychiatrists to explain his affection for tyrants,” Clinton said in San Diego, Calif. “I just wonder how anyone could be so wrong about who America’s real friends are. Because it matters. If you don’t know exactly who you’re dealing with, men like Putin will eat your lunch.”June 3, 2016: Music promoter Rob Goldstone emails Trump Jr. about setting up a meeting with a Russian government-connected lawyer, among other people, to discuss incriminating information about Clinton. Goldstone works with Emin Agalarov, the son of Russian billionaire developer Aras Agalarov. The Agalarovs already knew the future American president through connections established when Trump Sr. held the Miss Universe pageant in Moscow in 2013.“The Crown prosecutor of Russia met with his father Aras this morning and in their meeting offered to provide the Trump campaign with some official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and would be very useful to your father,” Goldstone wrote to Trump Jr. “This is obviously very high level and sensitive information but is part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump…”Trump Jr. was traveling at the time, but it took him just 20 minutes to reply: “if it’s what you say, I love it, especially later in the summer.”June 7, 2016: The 2016 primary season essentially concludes with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton as their parties’ presumptive nominees. At his primary night victory speech, Trump previews an upcoming attack in the form of a “major speech” he says he’s planning to give in the next few days.“I am going to give a major speech on, probably Monday of next week, and we are going to be discussing all of the things that have taken place with the Clintons,” Trump said. “I think you are going to find it very informative and very, very interesting.”Just hours before, Rob Goldstone had finalized plans for the meeting between Trump Jr., Natalia Veselnitskaya and others.June 9, 2016: Donald Trump Jr., Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, then-Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, meet in Trump Tower with Veselnitskaya, Russian-American lobbyist Rinat Akhmetshin and another Russian-American present to represent the interests of the Agalarovs.While the meeting was represented to include damaging information about Hillary Clinton, it instead focused on the Magnitsky Act.“I never had any damaging or sensitive information about Hillary Clinton. It was never my intention to have that,” Veselnitskaya told MSNBC.Donald Trump Jr. later told Fox News’ Sean Hannity that the meeting was “literally just a wasted 20 minutes, which was a shame.”That afternoon, Donald Trump tweets for the first time about Hillary Clinton’s emails.How long did it take your staff of 823 people to think that up–and where are your 33,000 emails that you deleted? https://t.co/gECLNtQizQ— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 9, 2016June 14, 2016: News breaks of two separate Russian breaches into the Democratic National Committee’s computer network. The hacks were perpetrated by Russian groups that have become known as Cozy Bear and Fancy Bear, identified by Washington, D.C., computer security company CrowdStrike. The hackers had been monitoring the DNC’s computer network for a year.June 22, 2016: In a speech in New York, Trump speculates that foreign adversaries may have hacked Clinton’s emails.“So they probably now have a blackmail file over someone who wants to be president of the United States,” he said. “This fact alone disqualifies her from the presidency.”July 5, 2016: FBI Director James Comey recommends no charges against Clinton for her handling of classified emails while she was secretary of state. Comey did, however, raise questions about her judgment, and described Clinton and her staff as being “extremely careless.” On July 2, Clinton told investigators her use of the private server was for convenience, not to avoid proper record-keeping.July 7, 2016: Carter Page, a Trump campaign adviser, gives a Russia-friendly speech in Moscow. This leads FBI investigators to obtain a secret warrant to monitor Page’s communications.July 18, 2016: Just before the Republican National Convention, the Trump campaign worked behind the scenes to change the GOP’s platform on Ukraine. The campaign announced that they would not call for the U.S. to give weapons to the Ukraine to fight Russian and rebel forces.July 21, 2016: The GOP convention concludes with Trump giving an ominous speech accepting the Republican nomination. Trump spoke about the country’s struggles with terrorism, crime and immigration, and vows to put “America first.”“This is the legacy of Hillary Clinton: death, destruction, terrorism and weakness,” he said.July 22, 2016: WikiLeaks publishes a first batch of almost 20,000 DNC emails, many of them discussing how to undermine Sen. Bernie Sander’s campaign. WikiLeaks officials stated that the emails come from the accounts of “seven key figures in the DNC.”The timing here is important, as the emails are published less than a week before the start of the Democratic National Convention, when candidates typically receive a polling boost.July 23, 2016: Trump continues pushing his theory of a “rigged” election process, in a tweet about the newly released emails.“Leaked e-mails of DNC show plans to destroy Bernie Sanders,” he says. “Mock his heritage and much more. On-line from Wikileakes, really vicious. RIGGED” July 24, 2016: Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigns in the wake of the DNC email hacking scandal. After Schultz’s abrupt resignation, Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge was named the chair of the Democratic convention and Donna Brazile, former Al Gore campaign manager and Bill Clinton adviser, temporarily takes control of the Democratic Party through the election.July 27, 2016: At a news conference, Trump has an overt message for Russia, in relation to Hillary Clinton’s emails.“Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing,” he said. “I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press.”Clinton’s campaign reacted predictably, with outrage, saying Trump was encouraging espionage by a foreign government.Also during the summer, according to the Daily Beast and CNN, the head of Cambridge Analytics, a data firm that did work for the Trump campaign, reaches out to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and offered to help organize and release Hillary Clinton’s missing 33,000 missing emails. Assange later confirmed on Twitter that a contact was made, but said the offer was rejected.I can confirm an approach by Cambridge Analytica [prior to November last year] and can confirm that it was rejected by WikiLeaks.— Julian Assange 🔹 (@JulianAssange) October 25, 2017Analytica is financially backed by billionaire Trump supporter Robert Mercer and his daughter Rebekah. Clinton said she deleted 33,000 personal emails from her time as secretary of state. To this date they have been the subject of much interest, including from Trump, who still mentions them regularly.Aug. 4, 2016: Obama CIA Director John Brennan confronts his Russian counterpart about Russia’s interference, as he later recounted in congressional testimony in May 2017. “[I] told him if you go down this road, it’s going to have serious consequences, not only for the bilateral relationship, but for our ability to work with Russia on any issue, because it is an assault on our democracy,” Brennan said on Meet the Press in July 2017. Brennan’s statements also followed attacks that the Obama administration faltered on deflecting Russian interference in the 2016 elections.Aug. 15, 2016: According to legal filings on Papadopoulos, after weeks of back and forth about a possible “off the record” trip to Moscow, a campaign supervisor writes in an email, ” ‘I would encourage you” and another foreign policy adviser to the Campaign to ‘make the trip [], if it is feasible.’ ” The trip did not take place.Aug. 19, 2016: Manafort resigns from the Trump campaign amid reports of suspicious payments for work he did for Russian linked elements in Ukraine. This marks the second shakeup of Trump senior campaign staff.Aug. 21, 2016: Roger Stone cryptically cryptically tweets, “Trust me, it will soon the Podesta’s time in the barrel, #Crooked Hillary” (his Twitter account was suspended in late October 2017.) Podesta was among the primary targets of hacks to the Democratic National Committee computer network; his emails were released by WikiLeaks starting Oct. 7. Sept. 8, 2016: Then-Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., meets with Kislyak in his Senate Office. This would be reported by the Washington Post and confirmed by NPR in March 2017, the same day that Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., questioned Sessions about the meeting during Sessions’ confirmation hearing to be attorney general. Sessions maintains that he never met with Russians or intermediaries “about the Trump campaign,” even though he was a top surrogate for the campaign at the time. Sessions did ultimately recuse himself from the Russia investigation.Jan. 27, 2017: Papadopoulos sits for an interview with the FBI, during which he “made material false statements and material omissions,” according to court filings released Oct. 30.Oct. 5, 2017: Papadopoulos pleads guilty to making false statements to FBI agents.Copyright 2017 NPR. 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Researchers create tiny pump that provides continuous and spontaneous antigravity water delivery

first_img For perhaps thousands of years people have wished for a way to move water from one location to another without the need for a power source, i.e. carrying or pumping it, especially when moving it uphill. In this new effort, the researchers have found a way to do that, albeit, with severe limitations.As the researchers note, scientists have seen many examples of water being moved up from a lower location in nature, capillary action, etc., but not in the way they were looking for. In this new effort the team looked to improve on such examples by taking advantage of both surface tension and a superhydrophobic material.To build their pump, the researchers created a superhydrophobic material by exposing a copper mesh to an alkali solution—the microscopic sized pockets it created caused water to slide with almost no friction. They then affixed the mesh to the bottom of a plastic tube that sat vertically. They next attached another tube to the first creating a right angle at the top and then attached a very short third tube to the second at its other end, this one pointing straight down. That was all it took. To use the pump, a bit of liquid was introduced into the pump, priming it, then a drop was introduced from beneath the pump, through the wire mesh. The liquid in the pump rose, because it was repelled from below, into the second tube and then into the third where it was expelled. © 2015 Phys.org More information: Superhydrophobic “Pump”: Continuous and Spontaneous Antigravity Water Delivery, Advanced Functional Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201501320AbstractAntigravity transportation of water, which is often observed in nature, is becoming a vital demand for advanced devices and new technology. Many studies have been devoted to the motion of a single droplet on a horizontal or inclined substrate under specific assistance. However, the self-propelled water motion, especially continuous antigravity water delivery, still remains a considerable challenge. Here, a novel self-ascending phenomenon driven only by the surface energy release of water droplets is found, and a superhydrophobic mesh to pump water up to a height of centimeter scale is designed. An integrated antigravity transportation system is also demonstrated to continuously and spontaneously pump water droplets without additional driving forces. The present novel finding and integrated devices should serve as a source of inspiration for the design of advanced materials and for the development of new technology with exciting applications in microfluidics, microdetectors, and intelligent systems.via NewScientist Play Credit: Advanced Functional Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201501320 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Shape shifting liquid metal able to propel itself through liquids (w/ video) Play Credit: Advanced Functional Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201501320 The team notes that such a device can only pump to a few centimeters in height before gravity wins over, preventing the drop from entering, much less pushing other liquid up.. They suggest it could be used as a design for advanced materials and in developing new kinds of technology applications in microfluidics, microdetectors or with intelligent systems. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Explore further Journal information: Advanced Functional Materials Citation: Researchers create tiny pump that provides continuous and spontaneous antigravity water delivery (2015, June 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-tiny-spontaneous-antigravity-delivery.html PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Beihang University in China has created a very tiny pump that is able to lift a drop of water without the use of any power source and move it to a higher location. In their paper published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, the team describes how they built their pump and the ways it might be used. Play Credit: Advanced Functional Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201501320 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Housing lives and more

first_imgThe fourth edition of Home Expo India gears up in the Capital and will be commencing on April 16 at India Expo Centre and Mart, Greater Noida. Organised by Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts, it displays home furnishings, textiles, furniture, houseware and decoratives. The show will e comprise three sub-shows — Indian Furnishings, Floorings and Textiles Show (IFFTEX), Indian Furniture and Accessories Shows (IFAS) and Indian Houseware and Decoratives Show (IHDS). Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Over 500 participants (including marts) will be displaying the best of their products offering a large number of overseas buyers three premium sourcing opportunities under one roof. The products on offer will be right from ready products to a choice in materials, components, hardware and accessories.  “The most important aspect of Home Expo India is the confirmation from large number of top buyers from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Brazil, Australia, Belgium, France, Germany,  Denmark, Greece, Finland, Cyprus, Estonia, Hong Kong, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon,  Netherland, Norway, Palestine, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, USA, UAE and UK  to visit and source this show”, said Rakesh Kumar, Executive Director, EPCH. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixEPCH has been successfully organising Asia’s largest Indian Handicrafts & Gifts Fair (IHGF) – Spring and Autumn for the past 21 years. The events promote exports of Handicrafts from India to various destinations. Over the years, IHGF has acquired the reputation of ‘One Stop Sourcing Event’ amongst the overseas buying community and ‘most effective marketing medium’ amongst the Indian exporting community.  EPCH will lay special focus on specialties of select regions of India in this show. There will be separate pavilion of products from North Eastern Region. On display will be home accessories, home furnishing, made ups, fabrics, shawls, textiles, gifts, trimmings and embellishments.  Handmade silk carpet, jute mats, houseware accessories and bags, furniture and furnishing textiles and gifts and fashion jewellery and accessories will also be exhibited. Another important aspect of the Home Expo India 2015 is the thematic exhibition of handicrafts products developed by artisans of SC category and artisans and craftpersons from mega clusters Lucknow, Bareilly and Bhuj. The objective of this thematic exhibition is to explore International market for their products and to have the opportunity of interacting directly with the overseas buyers.  They will be displaying houseware, decorative, gifts, Christmas, candles, incense sticks, home textiles, furnishing, floor coverings, fashion jewellery, accessories  and bags, cane and bamboo.Home Expo India 2015 is expected to generate great business deals for direct import and also for tie- ups, collaborations, alliances and joint ventures for product development, product innovation and international sales.last_img read more

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Club Med slashes Sun prices with Fun in the Sun Sale

first_imgClub Med slashes Sun prices with ‘Fun in the Sun Sale’ << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group Posted by Tags: Club Med, Mexico, Salescenter_img TORONTO — Club Med is deeply discounting top Sun destinations with its new ‘Fun in the Sun Sale’, kicking off this month.Running until Feb. 26, 2019, for travel between Jan. 14-Aug. 24, 2019, the sale allows Canadians to book winter and spring holidays at prices starting at $1,649 per adult, including airfare and perks. Participating Club Med resorts include those in Mexico, Florida and the Caribbean.The sale applies to packages with a minimum three-night stay and is valid for new individual bookings only.Select resorts include:Punta Cana: Highlights include the new Zen Oasis, the Cirque du Soleil-inspired CREACTIVE playground, and the Indigo Beach Lounge.Cancun Yucatan: Recently redesigned with a new Aguamarina Family Pool and Building, this 4-Trident resort features a new Boutique Concept and renovated main restaurant, oceanfront Superior and deluxe family rooms, and a family oasis pool along a secluded beach.Ixtapa Pacific: Named one of Mexico’s best family spots, this resort offers guests the chance to watch newly hatched baby turtles make their first trip into the ocean. Other offerings include kayaking around Isla Ixtapa, the newly renovated El Miramar Restaurant, a new spa and a new pool deck.More news:  TRAVELSAVERS welcomes Julie Virgilio to the teamAll-inclusive packages at Club Med include perks that include all flights and transfers, free room upgrades (for select travel dates), gourmet cuisine, sports and leisure activities, relaxation, open bar, and day/night childcare. Plus, kids under 15 will receive up to 50% off stays, while children under four stay for free. Monday, January 14, 2019 Sharelast_img read more

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Thomascookin launches Indias first foreign exchange mobile app

first_imgThomas Cook (India) Ltd launched its unique and user friendly ‘Foreign Exchange app’, a consumer empowering one-stop-shop for foreign exchange transactions.According to International Data Corporation (IDC), smartphone shipment in India grew 44% to 26.5 million units in June 2015. And equipped with his hand-held device, today’s digitally native Indian traveller (including business travellers, leisure, ad-hoc groups and last minute travellers) is increasingly impatient for information / transactions on the go. Thomas Cook India’s research having identified this blue ocean potential for secure and convenient foreign exchange transactions created its Foreign Exchange app to equip customers with easy, safe and smooth currency transactions with fulfilment while on the go.Thomas Cook’s android mobile app features Live Rates  across major global currencies including USD, Euro, Swiss Franc, to cover both buying and selling of foreign exchange; also a Block my Rate option as protection against rate fluctuations. The application also provides customers a handy tool of Rate Alerts for specified currencies via SMS & Email.Commenting on India’s first ever transactive mobile-app for Foreign Exchange, Amit Madhan, Chief Operating Officer – IT & E Services, Thomas Cook (India) Ltd said, “Thomas Cook India’s internal research has highlighted that while over 40% of our online transactions are via a mobile device, for foreign exchange this is truly noteworthy – at over 65%. Hence launching our Thomas Cook Forex app was clearly the need of the hour.”He added, “With mobile data reiterating the Indian travellers’ shift to M-commerce, coupled with India’s booming smartphone market, as pioneers in the Foreign Exchange space we are delighted to present he first ever mobile application and its slew of unique and customer empowering features for India’s Forex consumers on the go.”The mobile application is available on Android (2.3.3 and up), with iOS expected in the next two months.last_img read more

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Google is due to roll out its Google Fiber broadba

first_imgGoogle is due to roll out its Google Fiber broadband service in San Francisco using existing fibre infrastructure.Google said that it will bring service to some apartments, condos, and affordable housing properties using existing fibre“By using existing fiber to connect some apartments and condos, as we’ve done before, we can bring service to residents more quickly. This approach will allow us to serve a portion of San Francisco, complementing the city’s ongoing efforts to bring abundant, high-speed internet to the City by the Bay,” said Michael Slinger, director of business operations, Google Fiber.The news comes in the same week that Google said it is launching Google Fiber in Huntsville, Alabama using part of the fibre network being built by local gas, water and electricity supplier Huntsville Utilities.“To date, we’ve focused mostly on building fiber-optic networks from scratch. Now, as Google Fiber grows, we’re looking for more ways to serve cities of different shapes and sizes,” said Slinger.Google launched its Fiber initiative six years ago in Kansas City and has now connected a total of ten metropolitan areas across the US.last_img read more

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We missed Explorers League Honoree Mark ODea on

first_imgWe missed Explorers’ League Honoree Mark O’Dea on our last trip to Vancouver, so we called him up and got a fresh update on his activities. He’s focused on two companies right now, Pilot Gold (PLG.TO) and Pure Gold (PGM.V). The first one is in the International Speculator portfolio. His comments on both are examples of how geological insight can lead to economic discoveries. Louis James: Mark, thanks for talking with us today. You’re known for big discoveries – Michelin and Long Canyon – big, market-moving events that we’ve seen in the last round of this cycle. People want to know what you’re working on today. Mark O’Dea: Well, let’s reflect back on what’s happened over the last 15 years. We’ve created seven exploration and mining companies and have sold all but two of them, creating real value for our investors backed by real deposits that have already become or are going to become mines in the future. Our most recent success culminated in building an operating open-pit gold mine in West Africa and rolling it into Endeavour Mining in a change of control transaction. We currently have two high-quality exploration companies in our stable, which I am heavily focused on and invested in. They are Pilot Gold and Pure Gold. Let’s start with Pilot. Over the past six months it has gone through a pretty major transformation in terms of focus and leadership. We brought in a new CEO with a fresh perspective and real drive and hunger. The company is now run by Cal Everett, who is well known in the Canadian mining scene. He came out of retirement to run the company because of the potential he saw at our Goldstrike Project in Utah. Because of that, there has been a real pivot in terms of geographic focus, which is now squarely centered on our U.S. gold portfolio. What’s interesting about our U.S. projects is that when you look at The Great Basin, the epicenter of which is in Nevada, it captures all of our projects including our two newest projects: Goldstrike in Utah and Mineral Gulch in Idaho. The Great Basin hosts this huge proliferation of what has come to be known as Carlin-style gold deposits. They’re sediment-hosted deposits that have large endowments clustered in relatively small areas. If you take the outline of our Goldstrike project, for example, and superimpose it on the North Carlin Trend, that 65 square kilometers of real estate hosts over 60 million ounces of gold. I’m not saying that we are going to find 60 million ounces at Goldstrike. Heck, we’d be happy with five million. What I am saying is that this part of the world hosts some truly world-class gold systems. Our Goldstrike property hosts a real Carlin system so it inherently has significant size potential and certainly has the right geological address. L: I hadn’t quite realized how large the property is. Even if you hit and miss, if the geology is similar, there’s plenty of room for discovery. Mark: Right. The deposits that you find in The Great Basin, Carlin-style deposits, they can be really big. And they occur in clusters. The stratigraphic host rocks are exposed intermittently at Goldstrike over about a 30 square kilometer area. Everywhere that they are exposed, there is gold in them, either in surface samples or drill holes. This gives us a pretty big sandbox to play in! L: Which is why so many companies are exploring for gold in Nevada – but you’re working in Utah. Mark: We have important projects in Nevada too, but we’ve chosen to focus “off trend” because there’s less competition and we feel the rocks are just as prospective. That has pushed us towards the edges of the Great Basin, which doesn’t pay much attention to political boundaries. We believe we can apply some new geological thinking to lead us to discoveries. We intend to show that these Carlin systems are in no way limited to the Carlin trend, or the Cortez trend, or any of the famous trends in Nevada. L: Well, Long Canyon certainly proved that. Editor’s Note:  Long Canyon was the gold discovery that Ron Parrat’s AuEx Ventures and Mark O’Dea’s Fronteer Gold advanced and sold to gold major Newmont Mining. This was a huge win for our readers, on the order of 1000% gains. Interestingly enough, while in Nevada, Long Canyon is away from the main trends, close to the border with Utah. Mark: Long Canyon, exactly. It was one of the first new pins in the map that said – hey, guys, look over here. These Carlin systems are obviously not exclusive to one postal code. They don’t care where state borders lie. That led us to Goldstrike. It was a past-producing, open-pit, heap leach mine. Production came from a series of shallow pits focused on where mineralization outcropped. What they left behind was effectively the root of an iceberg, locally tested by shallow drill holes. Applying 3D modeling and new geological interpretations in that area has led us to conclude, unequivocally, that what they left behind are extensive down-dropped continuations of the original orebodies that have great lateral continuity, and are now under shallow cover. L: That’s the thesis Pilot is working on now. Mark: Yes. But it is not just a thesis anymore. It’s proven. We’re drilling and hitting targets that are the down-dropped continuations of the known historical orebodies. We are convinced that mineralization extends under cover over large areas and this project has the hallmarks of a multimillion-ounce system. We’re putting a second rig to work on it in September, and ramping up our exploration efforts. We expect to receive an approved plan of operations [exploration permit] by March 2017, which will allow us to really hit it hard in 2017. It’s exciting. In some ways, it’s greenfields, as we’re making new discoveries. But in many ways it’s brownfields, because it was a past-producing mine with good grade and good recoveries. Finding a multimillion-ounce, open-pit, heap leachable deposit in the Great Basin is extremely rare today. L: I picture you standing on a hill overlooking the property, waving your arms when you say that. Mark: I’m waving my arms for sure. But it doesn’t feel like it’s a big stretch. L: Agreed, given the size of the area you’re exploring. Mark: We’ve recently had some analysts down at the site, and everyone’s come away with a sense of scale. L: So, is it fair to say then that the shift from Kinsley to Goldstrike isn’t because there’s anything wrong with Kinsley. You still have a thesis there. You found the right horizon, and it’s widespread. That’s still to be tested. But Goldstrike is close to surface and it has a much bigger footprint. So you go after the big one first. Mark: Yes. That’s exactly what’s happened. I would call this lower-hanging fruit. It’s an easier system. It’s a bigger scale. It’s geologically and geometrically simpler. But Kinsley is still an excellent target. You know, our maiden resource there was almost the same as our maiden resource at Long Canyon. It was a half a million ounces at over two grams, which is excellent. It just needs a little more concentrated effort. If we had $100 million in the treasury, we’d be going after both of them concurrently, but we don’t. We had to decide where we’re going to get the most bang for our buck right now. The drilling at Goldstrike is shallow, fast, and inexpensive, and we are hitting gold in over 80% of the holes. L: As for the pivot you mentioned earlier, it seems rather prescient that you shifted your focus away from Turkey, in light of recent events there. Is that just fortuitous? Or did you guys feel warning tremors in the ground? Mark: Turkey is actually still a great place to work and explore. Especially when you are on the ground in our project area. But the headline risk makes it difficult for investors to stomach. We felt it was timely to focus on our U.S. portfolio which has a much warmer geopolitical risk profile. But I do want to stress that we have great projects in Turkey still. We are still 100% committed to the mineral potential. It is one of the few places in the world where you can walk up to outcropping porphyry mineralization, drill a hole, and make a discovery. At some point they’re going to create a tremendous amount of value. They’ll get sold or restarted down the road when things settle down there. But we were listening to our investors, and they just did not want to hear about Turkey, despite the phenomenal results and excellent projects. Having a U.S. gold-focused company made a whole lot of sense, with everything that’s going on in the world. Between Goldstrike, Kinsley and Mineral Gulch, we have our hands full with three great properties. If there’s one theme that you see repeatedly with our group, it’s that we try and get into projects that have lots of historical data. We can work with it, reinterpret it, remodel it, and recast it. Then we go out and test our new model. It’s a heck of a lot cheaper than starting from scratch. Moira Smith and her team are true superstars and minefinders. They have done a tremendous job. They drive the science and create the value over and over again. L: Sounds great, but we could probably talk about the Great Basin all day. Do you want to talk about Pure Gold? Mark: I’d love to, yes. Pure Gold’s Madsen project is similar in a lot of ways to Goldstrike, in the fact that it’s a past-producing mine, with a ton of infrastructure already there, but at the opposite end of the grade spectrum. It’s a Canadian high-grade underground project. What we love about the Madsen gold mine is that it ticks so many boxes. It is starting with a large high-grade resource of approximately 1.2 million ounces at 10g/t in MI&I. It has at least $200 million of capital already spent and available on the property, including a shaft to 1,275 meters, 27 levels of underground development, a 550 tonne per day mill, a tailings facility, and a ramp from surface to 150 meters accessing the McVeigh. The mill and tailings facility are permitted, with expansion opportunities to 1,089 tonnes per day, and the project is connected to roads and power, etc. But importantly, it’s never really had big-picture relook over the past 30 years. Claude Resources had it from 1998 to 2013 – but they had one single objective, which was to get the mine restarted by accessing the existing resource at depth using the shaft. Unfortunately, they never really had the capital to make that work. It’s not a bad approach at all, and I have no doubt it would work, but It’s just really expensive and they were capital-constrained. L: Such a pity too, because the mine is permitted and could be dusted off in a very short period of time. Mark: Yes, indeed. But we decided to take a different approach; turn the opportunity on its head. We know that the roots of this system are going to go on forever. They all do at Red Lake. They are currently mining down to 2,400 meters at Goldcorp’s Red Lake Gold Mine, for example. So these are deep, deep systems. Historically at Madsen, 2.5 million ounces were taken out from surface down to about 1.2 kilometers. There are hits way below that that illustrate that it keeps going. In fact, Placer Dome did a scoping study on it. They suggested that there’s probably upwards of five million ounces of upside along strike and deeper within that mine complex. So, again, we said: “That’s not going anywhere, let’s focus on the easier, shallow, high-grade extensions of this system.” We’re looking for high-grade, near-surface ounces that could be ramp-accessible. Rather than have to refurbish the shaft, and dewater, let’s look at ramp-accessible, high-grade continuations of this ore body along strike, in parallel zones, or in new targets a little bit further afield. That’s what we’ve been working on. The big breakthrough came about six months or eight months ago when we had a bit of a eureka moment with the geology. As you can see in the graphic I sent you, there are two parallel zones. So imagine two veins. They aren’t real veins, but they are vein systems. These two parallel zones are dipping steeply. The main one is called Austin. The Austin Horizon hosted about 95% of the ore that’s ever been mined out of Madsen. It was mined from surface to about 1.2 kilometers down. About 150 meters into the footwall of the Austin, there’s another zone. It’s dead parallel. It’s called the McVeigh. It looks identical to the Austin. The old-timers stopped mining the McVeigh at about 150 meters below surface. We couldn’t figure out why. They had a deep-rooted ore system in the Austin. They had the same ore body in the McVeigh. But for some reason, they stopped mining at 150 meters. Surely it must keep going, but where? Thinking about this, we came to the conclusion that the stratigraphy there is folded; the McVeigh is the Austin. If you fold the Austin – imagine projecting it into the air, folding it over, and then coming down on the other limb – it’s the same horizon. Are you with me? L: Yes. So it was folded into an anticline and the top was eroded away? Mark: Yes, an eroded anticline. So, the ore in the Austin was plunging in a certain direction. It was like a pencil, or a cigar, within the plane of the structure. It was all plunging in one direction. So if you imagine drawing this on a sheet of paper and then folding it over… L: Ah! If you fold it over, the plunge on the other side – the McVeigh side – would be in the opposite direction. Mark: Exactly. It’s an old magic trick, right? [Laughs] We believe they stopped mining because they thought the McVeigh should plunge in the same direction as the Austin. But it doesn’t. It plunges in a different direction. That’s what we’ve been testing – and we’ve been hitting, over and over again, below the old workings. There is absolutely no doubt that mineralization within the McVeigh continues way below the old workings and is wide open in all directions. We’ve hit it repeatedly in new holes with intercepts such as 11.0 g/t gold over 5.9 meters, 10.9 g/t gold over 9.8 meters, 31.3 g/t gold over 3.7 meters, and 50.2 g/t gold over 4.0 meters. In fact, we’ve dug up an old Claude hole where they hit it inadvertently at 1,000 meters’ depth. L: They hit it by accident? Mark: They were targeting a different zone and they had to go through the McVeigh to get to it. They reported a mineralized interval running 17.7 g/t gold over 2.0 meters, but it was the McVeigh. The McVeigh is the same horizon as the Austin, folded over, and now we know it’s mineralized down to over 1,000 meters’ depth, starting from surface. We’re drilling now below the old workings at about 400 meters and we are hitting. We now have 600 meters of a gap that we need to fill in with pierce points to build this new deposit. It’s a brand-new discovery. It’s been sitting there, untested for 40 years, just 150 meters from the old mine. L: That’s a great story. It reminds me of Ron Parratt’s first six holes at Long Canyon. He’d said: “What if it dips in the other direction?” They drilled and boom, boom, boom… Mark: There you go. It takes a bit of luck, but also a little different thinking. So far, it’s working. The Austin produced about 2,000 ounces per vertical meter. In the scheme of high-grade underground deposits, that’s pretty darn good. Anything north of 1,500 ounces per vertical meter is a nice system. It’s a strong system that’s going to be economic. If you apply that metric to the McVeigh and estimate upwards of 2,000 ounces per vertical meter, and you’ve got a kilometer of depth potentially, there could be a couple million ounces there. Now, maybe that’s on the high side, I don’t know. But there’s got to be at least a million ounces if this thing has continuity, depending on how many chutes of high-grade material we can find within that limb. L: And this would be relatively easy to put into production. Mark: Yes. Madsen is essentially permitted for production. That’s the other part of the story that’s unique. We’ve got a fully permitted mine with a mill and a tailings facility with capacity and room for expansion. We have $200 million of infrastructure in place, including a shaft for ventilation and a decline that goes down to 150 meters that we can extend for very little capital. It’s a turnkey mining operation, with power, trained labor nearby, and all of that capital you don’t need to sink. So we said, lets backstop the value of this enterprise by doing a base-case preliminary economic assessment (PEA). For the purposes of the study, we assumed that we don’t find a single ounce of additional gold, and that all we have to work with is the 1.2 million-ounce remnant resource. We estimated that there are around 300,000 ounces that we can access by ramp, from surface down to about 500 meters’ depth. The economics of those ounces are incredible, because the capital required to open that decline, refurbish the mill, and do development work is only about $20 million. L: The key reason the economics came out so different from what was done before is that you’re looking at a ramp rather than using the old shaft. Is that right? Mark: That’s exactly right. The study at today’s gold price and today’s exchange rate generates an NPV of about $170 million, from a 50,000-ounce-per-year producer lasting six years. That’s because there’s effectively negligible capital that goes into this. Your return on capital is huge. So we have a base case in which we don’t find any more gold – all of the holes we drill are zero – and we still have $1.00 per share in NPV today, on a fully diluted basis. But the exciting thing is that we know there is more gold because we are building continuity of gold below the old McVeigh workings. Our intention is not to go into production for six years at 50,000 ounces a year. Our intention is to try and double that. We want to get to a new base-case scenario through additional discovery, in which we can become a 100,000-plus-ounce-per-year producer. It’s a little-known fact that while Madsen operated at 550 tonnes per day, it’s permitted for 1,089 tonnes per day. We could double the capacity of the mill. The permits are in place. At the grades we’re hitting, we could easily become a new 100,000-ounce-per-year producer in Red Lake. L: And that’s big enough to make Pure Gold an interesting takeover target. Mark: Absolutely. And then you factor in the regional consolidation that we’ve done. We’ve rolled in new ground. We have made two new discoveries in Russet South and in other areas within trucking distance of the mill. There are other satellite zones that are showing this to be a very fertile area. It just hasn’t been thoroughly explored. L: That’s a great story, Mark. I guess the question our readers might have now is: Is there going to be a new Mark O’Dea play? You sold True Gold, these two are coming along nicely – is there an earlier-stage company we can get in on the ground floor? Mark: Nothing that we can talk about right now. We are looking at a number of things that are extremely interesting. They’re getting harder to find, I have to say. But there are a few things that we’re actively looking at right now in the gold space and also in the base metal space. We’ll see if any of those come to fruition. I hope they do. L: Alright. Well, keep us posted. Mark: Speaking of True Gold, I actually view our accomplishments out there as among the proudest things I’ve ever been involved in. Look at the economics that have come out of this, especially post-deal with Endeavour. What started out as a 43% premium – that’s now layered on another 100% return on top of that 43% premium – it’s turned into a $500 million deal. That’s exactly the sort of return that we were hoping to see. L: Because True Gold sold at a 43% premium to Endeavour for shares, then Endeavour rose 100% after the deal, adding even more value for True Gold shareholders. Mark: Yes. That was the rationale for doing this deal. It wasn’t a sale. It was all about becoming a meaningful part of something bigger that will trade at higher multiples than a single asset producer. True Gold shareholders own a meaningful chunk of it, and have greater leverage to the price of gold, as Endeavour grows. And the True Gold team achieved this in a three-year period. We took a cashed-up shell called Blue Gold, merged with Riverstone, drilled off Karma, permitted it, funded it in the toughest part of the market, built an operating mine, and sold it − all within three years. It was an incredibly intense and rewarding period. I hope people realize what was delivered. Delivering any mine in any market is no easy feat. L: Right. And in the face of really serious challenges. Do you have any sense for how many of your shareholders held on when the local trouble flared up? No one was hurt, but equipment was destroyed. And you guys won over the locals, got the mine built. Kudos. But I wonder how many shareholders stuck with you and were able to reap the benefits you were talking about? Mark: I don’t know. It’s hard to quantify. I know the big ones did – like Liberty, and Teck, and all of us in house. It’s turned out to be an absolutely spectacular outcome and something that everybody involved in True Gold should be very, very proud of having achieved. L: It’s good. You didn’t mention it, but this was a win-win-win-win or something, if you count all the different stakeholders. That mine is built in one of the most poverty-stricken, parched pieces of earth in the world. And you’ve just opened up a geyser of money, training, and productive work there. You’ve given positive purpose in life to people who desperately need it. With no handouts. No insulting, dehumanizing “government help,” but real honest work. It’s a community-changing, positive event. And you did it for profit. It’s a beautiful example of how the system should work. So congratulations. Mark: Thank you. I couldn’t agree more. L: Well, thanks for your time and insight. Good luck going forward. Mark: My pleasure and same to your readers.last_img read more

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Several recent surveys show that thousands of doct

first_imgSeveral recent surveys show that thousands of doctors in North Carolina are over-prescribing opioids, in violation of a new state law. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services says more than 16,000 doctors across the state prescribed too many opioids in March alone.The survey, which was presented to the state Medical Board on Tuesday, focuses on physicians.Blue Cross and Blue Shield released a study on Monday that claims about 4,500 doctors, dentists and other medical professionals wrote prescriptions exceeding state-mandated limits between January and April.The NC STOP Act went into effect January 1st.  The law limits opioid prescriptions to five days for first-time patients with short-term pain, or seven days if the patient had surgery.The News and Observer reports the March survey is the first time DHHS has provided the Medical Board with the names of errant doctors.The paper says while the board is questioning the accuracy of the data, it’s taking the scale of potential violations seriously, and scrambling to address the issue.last_img read more

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The leader of Manchester City Council MCC has be

first_imgThe leader of Manchester City Council (MCC) has been bombarded with emails from disabled people and their allies over his plans to push ahead with a “discriminatory” memorial to victims of the Peterloo massacre.Many of them told Labour’s Sir Richard Leese that they were “angry and shocked” that a memorial designed to remember those who marched for liberty and equality should be “designed and built with discrimination and inequality at its heart”.The council has told Disability News Service (DNS) it is unlikely that any “fundamental changes” will be made to the memorial, which is due to be unveiled to the public on 16 August, the 200th anniversary of the massacre.But in a further sign of Leese’s dismissal of the concerns, he has refused to comment personally on the emails, and has even refused to provide an estimate of how many he has received.Meanwhile, disabled people and their allies are set to protest this evening (Thursday) at the site of the memorial, outside the Manchester Central Convention Centre.The council-funded memorial will be a series of concentric circles, with members of the public encouraged to climb the steps to a flat top.It will be completely inaccessible to many disabled people, even though it has been designed by artist Jeremy Deller to allow it to be used as a platform for speakers and demonstrators, mirroring those who spoke during the protest in 1819.On 16 August 1819, paramilitary and military forces attacked more than 60,000 peaceful, pro-democracy and anti-poverty protesters in Manchester, which led to 18 deaths and an estimated 700 serious injuries.Deller himself has said he wants people “to be able to sit on it and have their lunch”, while the council’s own access statement said: “The artist’s intention is that the memorial will become the meeting point for the annual gathering of the Peterloo Memorial Campaign, as well as for other events related to the issue of human rights around the world.“At these events, people will stand on it and around it.”Deller said last week that he hoped that “once the memorial is built there might be a way to adapt it for wheelchairs”, but by noon today (Thursday) he had failed to comment on the council’s position that it was probably too late for further major changes.Although some changes have been made as a result of concerns about access, including the addition of a handrail, it appears that wheelchair-users will still only be able to reach the height of the lowest of the circles via a ramp.The Peterloo Memorial Campaign, which campaigned for years for a memorial to be built, has said that disabled people are “right to be frustrated and angry about the lack of access to the monument”, which “has been designed as a platform for speakers and demonstrators”.Among those who sent letters to Leese was the disabled artist-activist Liz Crow, who told him she was “heartbroken” at his council’s decision to continue with its plans despite knowing that the memorial would be inaccessible to many residents and visitors.She told him: “I am so shocked that this could ever have been allowed to get to this point, but to find that – even now you are fully aware of the discrimination inherent in these plans – you are going ahead regardless beggars belief.”She called on him to halt the project immediately and “re-work the proposal to ensure that it is a memorial to democracy and not to MCC’s ineptitude and hypocrisy”.Tony Baldwinson, who worked for the council for more than 10 years from 1991, appealed to Leese to admit he had made a mistake, and told him: “It is totally designed to be ascended, and disabled people would be excluded from a monument to democracy.”Many of the others who wrote to Leese told him the memorial was “a fine example of inequality and discrimination embedded in design” and was set to be “a glaring metaphor for inequality and segregation” and an “act of exclusion that denies disabled people a voice, a blatant act of discrimination”.One campaigner, Jane Angel, asked Leese in her email: “How did this happen in this day and age?  “A brand new memorial, in development for years, and we are building something that is not accessible to people to whom steps are a barrier.”Another, Joan Rutherford, who campaigns for an inclusive built environment, told Leese in her email: “Manchester has waited 200 years for a fitting memorial to this appalling massacre. “The requirements for the memorial were that it should be Respectful, Informative and Permanent (RIP). “In my view this design is not inclusive and therefore is not respectful.“If the monument is built as designed it will be an opportunity lost to celebrate and truly promote the aspiration for which people gave their lives… Equality.”A council spokesperson said Leese had been “made aware” of questions from DNS about the emails.The spokesperson said in a statement on behalf of the council, rather than Leese himself: “Our position remains that we have made significant changes to the original design of this public artwork to improve accessibility and that, while the memorial is not intended to be viewed exclusively from the top, the elements which provide information about Peterloo are all accessible. “It is a misunderstanding of this memorial artwork to suggest that its sole or even primary purposes involves ascending it and that it cannot be properly viewed, appreciated or engaged with otherwise.“While we totally respect the views of those who disagree and we are keen to continue constructive dialogue with them, it should be remembered that this is a memorial piece of art rather than a building or similar structure and is being created both in time for the 200th anniversary of Peterloo this summer and within the limitations of the site, the only one available within the St Peter’s Field area where the tragic events of 1819 took place.”Picture by Brian Hilton A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

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8 Ways the Internet of Things Will Impact Your Everyday Life

first_img Puneet Mehta Register Now » 5 min read Technology CEO and Founder, Msg.ai –shares 8 Ways the ‘Internet of Things’ Will Impact Your Everyday Life Add to Queue Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Next Article January 24, 2014 Bigger than the Industrial Revolution.This is how some analysts talk about the budding “Internet of Things” and the innovation that will come as a result. We will start to see a plethora of “dumb” objects become connected, sending signals to each other and alerts to our phones, and creating mounds of “little data” on all of us that will make marketers salivate. The Internet of Things took center stage at CES, with connected tennis rackets and crockpots capturing early headlines.Some of the largest tech behemoths have recently joined together to make the Internet of Things a closer reality in all of our homes, cars and lives. The AllSeen Alliance is seeing companies such as Cisco, Panasonic and Sharp pledging to make their pipelines of new appliances and devices compatible with a networking system so machines can start interacting. By 2017, we will see smart objects hitting shelves on broad scale and we will start reducing waste, costs and inconvenience while increasing efficiency and safety.Related: The Wackiest Gadgets and Other Tech at CESHere are the changes coming to our everyday lives — some obvious, other perhaps less obvious — that I am most excited about in the Internet of Things:Tuning your car: As more machines speak to each other and systems integrate, you will no longer miss an oil change. Your truly “smart” car will preemptively reach out to your mechanic when it is time for the annual tune up or your tire pressure is running low, and by cross referencing your calendar, appointment suggestions will be delivered to you to confirm a time with one click.Monitoring your health: When a prescription is running low, an appointment will be made with your physician through connected RX bottles. Doctors will be kept informed with how often and when their patients are taking their medicine and those with ongoing health issues will be able to have things such as blood pressure and sugar levels monitored remotely.Energy consumption: High-energy consumption household appliances will adjust based on dynamic price signals to lower your electric bill. Thermostats and lighting will learn your habits to create the optimal setting based on your daily life, such as turning to your ideal temperature just before you arrive home. These gadgets will also sense when no one is in the house and turn off automatically to reduce wastes and costs.Driving and traffic jams: Driving will get a lot safer. Traffic lights will be able to adjust to real-time traffic conditions such as when an emergency vehicle is approaching. Road sensors will make changes to the speed limit based on weather and accidents, while also communicating directly to car dashboards about unsafe conditions (e.g. Slow down. The turn in a quarter mile is icey).Grocery lists: Smart refrigerators will sense when you are running low on staples such as eggs or milk and will automatically populate your grocery list. Stores will push reminders to add items to your list when it predicts you about to run out based on your historical purchasing behavior and average buying trends. When you are walking through the store, reminders will get pushed to you to ensure you never have to make that dreaded second trip.Related: Uh, Did Your Refrigerator Just Send Me an Internet Virus?Our morning alarm: The traffic on your route to work and the weather will soon affect what time your alarm goes off. If there is an accident or road construction on your usual drive, your alarm will go off early and alternate routes will populate in your dashboard. Of course, your coffee machine will be in the loop to make sure you have your cup of joe for the road.Monitoring your baby: Through their smartphones, parents will monitor their baby’s breathing, temperature and activity. Babies will don connected onesies that will send an alert when there is anything abnormal. Of course, the other babies in your life will also reap the benefits of connectivity. Pet monitoring systems will allow you to monitor their activity and behavior from afar, so you can see how well your potty training is working and how honest your dog walker really is.What’s on your body: Wearable tech has perhaps gotten the most attention in the Internet of Things chatter to date. Many products are now in their second or third generations, offering sleeker designs and more integration with different systems. From monitoring activity during workouts to sleeping patterns to hearing aids, the devices that we “wear” are becoming much more sophisticated, connecting to all of our social media accounts, and tracking much more quality and quantity data.The budding number of sensors will detect and act on environmental and other contextual factors, such as weather; will be aware of who and how many people are around in its vicinity to change levels of input and output; and adjust to save resources and improve safety.With the growing number of connected things in our lives, we will all become more in tune with our own data (a la Nike Fuelband) and start to expect more personal interactions with brands and retailers. Marketers will need to establish a trust among consumers and prove that if they give up access to some of their personal data, in return they will get more tailored offers, deals and interactions.Smartphones will become not only everyone’s portal into the Internet of Things ecosystem (look no further than smartphone-controlled light bulbs), but a complete remote control to your life (if it isn’t already). Every enterprise needs to take mobile even more seriously and have it as a key point of consideration of future connected efforts.Related: Wearable Tech Could Someday Be as Common as Smartphones Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Guest Writer Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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Study Women are diagnosed for diseases later in life than men

first_img In connection with 770 types of diseases, women were diagnosed later than men. There was an average difference of about four years. In case of cancer, women were on average diagnosed 2.5 years later than men. For metabolic diseases such as diabetes, women were on average diagnosed about 4.5 years later. Source: https://healthsciences.ku.dk/newsfaculty-news/2019/03/study-across-diseases-women-are-diagnosed-later-than-men/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 11 2019When men and women contract a disease, it is very different when this is discovered by the healthcare system. On average, women are diagnosed later in life than men. This issue has been studied and analyzed by researchers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation’s Center for Protein Research, the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, UCPH, in a comprehensive study where data from the entire Danish population have been in use. The new research results have been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.’When we look across all diseases, we see a tendency that women on average are diagnosed later than men. We have looked not just at diseases, but also at the course of the patient care. Our study zooms in on the areas where the differences are most pronounced – both for the individual diseases and for the course of the patient care. The message is that the national strategies that are established need to take a difference into account. We can no longer use the ‘one size fits all’ model. We are already heading in that direction with respect to personalized medicine,’ says last author and Professor Søren Brunak, the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research.The researchers analyzed data from 6.9 million Danish people. The population was divided into two groups according to their sex. Over a 21-year period, from 1994 to 2015, the researchers have e.g. analyzed the occurrence of all types of diseases, multimorbidity, where you suffer from more than one disease, and courses of patient care. They found that women on average are older when they are diagnosed compared to men. The entire sequence of the women’s and men’s patient care course was different and time-staggered.In connection with ADHD, there was a difference of almost six years between the time when the two groups were diagnosed with the disease. The boys were about 14 years old, while the girls were about 20 years old. Here, according to the researchers, some studies point out that the reason for the difference is that women have a different subtype of ADHD, which manifests itself in a quiet and solitary manner as opposed to the externalizing behavior often seen in boys with ADHD.Related StoriesApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchOsteoporosis Was the ExceptionOsteoporosis was one of the exceptions where women were diagnosed first. Here, women were typically diagnosed before they suffered a fracture caused by the disease, while the course for men was the opposite. They were typically not diagnosed until they turned up at the emergency room with a fracture.Scientists do not yet know whether the differences are due to genetics, environment, diagnostic criteria or a mixture hereof. They are currently investigating this in their next step in collaboration with a research team from Finland. But they believe that there is a need to think about the sex right from the start of the research in tests with rats and mice.’It has been surprising to see that there is such a big difference between the diseases that affect men and women and between their patient care courses in a society where otherwise, we have equal and uniform access to the healthcare system. Now we are trying to map out what really lies behind the differences we see. Can they e.g. be attributed to genetics or environment and culture?’ asks first author and Postdoc David Westergaard, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research.’But we need to think about the fact that there may be a sex difference right from the beginning at the hospitals and in the research. Traditionally, e.g. 50 men and women will be recruited for clinical trials. Afterwards you look at the overall effect for the test participants. But you forget to make a subanalysis, where you look at the groups separately to see if there are differences. This has only been done during recent years,’ says David Westergaard.last_img read more

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Five ways to help keep senior citizens safe during summer

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 22 2019Not everyone is aware that summer weather and activities may be challenging for older adults. Senior citizens react differently to hot weather than younger people. They are typically more susceptible to dehydration and heat-related illnesses. They may also become disoriented by certain summer activities.Included here are five ways to help keep the senior citizens in your life active, healthy, and safe this summer.1: Hydration, hydration, hydrationDehydration can lead to several serious complications, such as heat exhaustion or increased risk of a fall, particularly among seniors. Senior citizens are generally more susceptible to dehydration than younger adults because of changes in the way the body regulates its temperature and a reduction in the amount of sweat produced.Some senior citizens may also be taking medications, such as diuretics or cardiac medications, which make them more prone to dehydration. Or, they may avoid drinking water because of the effort it takes to get up and go to the bathroom, especially if they use a walker or are in a wheelchair. Additionally, because the senses dull with age, seniors may not feel thirsty so they may not realize they need to drink water until they are already dehydrated.There are a lot of ways a caregiver can help a senior citizen stay hydrated. First, encourage seniors to drink plenty of water even if they aren’t thirsty, especially in hot weather. Avoid alcohol, sugary beverages, and caffeinated drinks because these can add to dehydration. For most people, water is the best drink to stay hydrated.Learn the signs of dehydration and check in frequently. If you notice that a senior is losing weight, has very dark colored urine, is experiencing leg cramps, or is feeling weak, nauseous, fatigued, or vomiting, they may be dehydrated. Instead of asking if they are thirsty, just hand them a drink. This is especially important for elderly with significant dementia because they may not know to drink water. Also, make sure that the fridge is stocked with plenty of water.Finally, speak with your senior’s healthcare provider to find the right balance between staying hydrated and managing other conditions. Ask if any medications can cause dehydration and whether the doses for certain medications, such as diuretics, need to be reduced during the summer months.2: Stay coolChecking that seniors have regular access to air conditioning (AC) is important to help them avoid dehydration and other heat-related illnesses. In hot weather, a fan is not enough to stay cool, so check that the home AC system is functioning properly. If AC at home isn’t available or effective enough during the daytime hours, make sure your senior has access to a nearby, safe location with AC like a senior center or mall. AC is especially important for seniors with respiratory conditions like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) because heat and humidity can aggravate their breathing.3: Protect skin and eyes from the sunRelated StoriesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionWhen planning outdoor activities, remember that seniors may be more photosensitive, or sensitive to the sun, than younger adults because: some medications can lead to increased photosensitivity; thinning skin can leave seniors vulnerable to sunburn; and, eye conditions such as macular degeneration or cataracts can cause eyes to be sensitive to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays.To avoid sun-related injury, seniors should apply sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 about 30 minutes before going outside, and then reapply it about every two hours. Protective clothing, such as hats that shade the face and cover the head, and light-colored, light-weight cotton fabric shirts and pants are also useful to block the sun’s rays and help seniors stay cool. They should also wear sunglasses with UV protection lenses that are UV400.Consider limiting outdoor time to early in the morning or later in the evening because the sun’s rays are strongest between 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.4: Take travel precautions for seniors who have dementiaIf you are planning a vacation and have invited a senior citizen who has dementia to come with you, make sure to consider their health and safety. People with dementia need familiarity, repetition, and continuity of care. So changing their environment by going on vacation can be difficult and confusing.Consider planning trips to a familiar place instead of a new destination. A familiar environment is frequently safer for a person with dementia because their long-term memory is better than their short-term memory. A place they know, like a vacation home they’ve been going to for many years, can reduce stress and confusion from travel.Make sure to have the person with dementia wear an identification bracelet. Wearing identification can help them find their way to the group again if they wander off.5: Build and use a support systemA support system is incredibly important for seniors all year round, especially for those who don’t have family nearby. Building a senior’s support network can be as simple as introducing yourself to his or her neighbors and asking them to keep an eye out for your loved one.Set up a system so your senior can let others know they are “okay.” For instance, if living in a senior housing community, your senior can put a note or a magnet on their front door every morning and remove it at night. They can also send short, daily text messages to family or friends as they go about their day.Whatever system you choose to use, make sure to pay attention to it and question any irregularities. A support system can be the difference between safety and catastrophe.Enjoy summer!By taking special precautions and establishing a support system, the senior under your care can have an active, healthy, and safe summer. Source:Western Connecticut Health Networklast_img read more

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