Railways to give second chance to 70,000 rejected job applicants

first_imgThe railways has decided to give a second chance to 70,000 candidates, whose job applications were rejected due to faulty upload of photos, by giving them a window of three days to rectify their mistakes, a spokesperson of the ministry said on Wednesday.While scrutinising the applications, officials realised that out of the 48 lakh applications received by railways for the 26,500 posts of assistant loco pilots and technicians, 1.33 lakh were found to be ineligible for varied reasons.”We realised that among the total applications that were found ineligible, around 1.27 lakh candidates were found ineligible for invalid pictures. We decided to look at those applications again and give them a second chance,” officials said.”Out of the 1.27 lakh people, now, 70,000 have been asked to make the changes in the pictures and upload them again,” said Rajesh Dutt Bajpai, Director Information and Publicity, Railway Board.The railways has given candidates three days — July 18-July 20 — to rectify their mistakes and upload their pictures on the railway recruitment board site.Sources say that applications of another 57,000 candidates were internally reviewed and re-considered, without any need for changes from applicants’ side.Out of the total applications found ineligible, only 7,000 applications were rejected because of earlier cases of cheating or any other reasons for which they were barred from appearing from railway exams.The 70,000 applicants, who were given a second chance, were sent emails and messages, asking them to rectify their mistakes.Bajpai also said a similar process would be followed for other posts advertised by the railways earlier this year, giving candidates second chance.advertisementThe Indian Railways will fill up over one lakh vacant posts by March-April next year.The railways received around 2.27 crore applications for about 1.10 lakh vacancies it had advertised.The examination for the posts, including those in the Railway Protection Force, would be conducted in the months of September, October and November this year.ALSO READ | Railway Recruitment Cell is hiring sports persons; last date to apply August 10ALSO WATCH | How Railways constructed subway tunnel in 4.5 hours flatlast_img read more

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a month agoMan Utd defender Smalling still struggling to make Roma debut

first_imgMan Utd defender Smalling still struggling to make Roma debutby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United defender Chris Smalling is still struggling to make his Roma debut.TMW says Roma are waiting on the fitness of Smalling ahead of their Europa League opener against Istanbul Basaksehir.He returned to training after missing the Serie A fixture against Sassuolo, but is still a doubt for Thursday’s fixture.Smalling is yet to feature for Roma since moving on loan, after he was an unused substitute for the derby clash with Lazio.The defender is on-loan to the end of this season. TagsLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Sir Roger Moore Calls For More Help In The Philippines

first_imgUNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Sir Roger Moore today visited UNICEF’s global humanitarian supply warehouse in Copenhagen and called for continued support for children and their families in the Philippines whose lives have been devastated by super typhoon Haiyan.On a visit to UNICEF’s global supply warehouse in Copenhagen, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, Sir Roger Moore called for continued public support for children and families whose world was ripped apart by super typhoon Haiyan. Credit/Copyright: UNICEF/DENM2013-00317/MARIA IEROIANNIAccompanied by his wife Lady Kristina, the legendary actor visited the UNICEF warehouse where staff has been packing and shipping out life-saving supplies at full force since Haiyan hit the archipelago two weeks ago. In the past two weeks, UNICEF has sent 240 metric tonnes of life-saving supplies from its warehouses in Copenhagen and Dubai.Sir Roger noted the enormous destruction left in the wake of the typhoon and the scale of the emergency response. “There are some five million children who need help – nearly half of them have lost their homes and some are separated from their parents. We are dealing with families spread across 1,500 emergency camps. Many, many people have lost simply everything but their lives,” he said.Sir Roger, perhaps best known for his role as secret agent James Bond, was also briefed on the humanitarian assistance that UNICEF has been providing since the typhoon hit the Philippines.“The first priority is restoring access to clean water,” explained Joselito Nuguid, the Deputy Director in charge of operations for UNICEF’s Supply Division.UNICEF has helped to restore 80 per cent of piped water in Tacloban, the largest city hit by the typhoon. Airlifts have also included water treatment units, water bladders, family water kits, and latrines to help prevent the spread of disease.To date, UNICEF has sent 25 plane loads of life-saving supplies to the Philippines. The organization has received tremendous assistance from British Airways, Emirates Airlines, and KLM who have donated cargo space from UNICEF’s main supply hubs to destinations where the need is greatest.Sir Roger was moved by the generous outpouring of international support in the wake of the world’s most powerful storm, and emphasized the need to keep the momentum going. 
”We must keep focused on making sure children continue to be supported,” said Sir Roger. “There is so very much that still needs to be done.”Source:UNICEFlast_img read more

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Shaking up Canadas buttoneddown fashion world

first_imgAdvertisement But while demand from shoppers for distinctive wardrobes is growing, designers — especially those inspired by diverse influences — still face an uphill battle. “The Canadian market isn’t very adventurous,” says Gail McInnes, owner of Magnet Creative Management and the editor-in-chief of Pull, a fashion magazine. “Bloggers wear colour during fashion week to get photographed, but the rest of the time we wear a lot of black and a lot of neutrals.”Lisa Tant, who spent nearly nine years as the editor of Flare magazine and is now a sales director at Nordstrom, agrees, saying that Canadian retail doesn’t stray too far from standard fashion. “There are boutiques here and there that are very innovative, and there are certain people who will wear anything, but in general, Canadians veer towards the conservative,” she says. “It has to be a global trend before it takes hold here.” That might be why Canada struggles to keep its home-grown fashion talent: many well-known designers make their names abroad — Erdem achieved success in the U.K., for example, and Tanya Taylor and Jason Wu, both of whom have dressed Michele Obama, are based in the U.S.Though her collections can increasingly be found on red carpets and in magazines, Jassal is still working to place her clothing in a major store.  “I’m a Canadian Indian, but I feel like the fashion industries in both countries don’t accept me completely,” she says. “When I take my designs to the Canadian industry, they’re too exotic, too Indian. But I applied to Bombay Fashion Week and was told, technically you’re not Indian, you’re Canadian now.”There are signs, however, that those distinctions are starting to matter less. “I find that because the world is such a small place now, thanks to social media, people are much more interested in other cultures,” Tant says. And Jassal has noticed that fans of her line will mix and match pieces with their existing wardrobes, pairing colourful, full-length, embroidered skirts with leather jackets, and cropped tops trimmed with feathers or tassels with trousers.And this past February, Uniqlo — a Japanese brand best known for its affordable, minimalistic basics — launched a collaboration with Hana Tajima, a British-Japanese Muslim fashion designer, that includes hijabs, abayas, and baju kurung, a traditional Malay form of dress. Fifteen countries have featured the collaboration, including Canada, which assistant PR manager Catherine Couturier says was specifically chosen because of its diverse population. In March, Nike, announced that its Pro Hijab would be available in three colours starting in spring 2018.As for Jassal, she’s now more focused on carving out a niche than fitting into one. “What I have found is that there are more girls who relate to what I am feeling, and that’s why my clothes resonate with another type of market,” she says. “It’s a market that isn’t completely Indian but not completely Canadian — or, better said, it is the perfect mix of both.”By Renée Sylvestre-WilliamsRenée Sylvestre-Williams is a writer living in Toronto. Her work has been published in The Globe and Mail, Canadian Living, and Quartz. Advertisement Mani Jassal does not make saris. “What I do is lenghas, which are separates, like a crop top with a ball-gown skirt,” says the 25-year-old Toronto-based designer. “But saris are the typical garment that people think of when they think of Indian clothes.”When Jassal began studying fashion at Ryerson University in 2009, her intention wasn’t to design lenghas. Instead, she planned to concentrate on red-carpet and evening wear. Jassal hadn’t grown up with much interest in South Asian clothing — most of her exposure to it came through Bollywood movies, which she says didn’t impress her. But then she picked up a copy of Vogue India and saw the skill and craftsmanship that went into the designs. Thanks to that magazine, Jassal decided in her final year to experiment with non-traditional bridal wear for Mass Exodus 2013, Ryerson’s student-run fashion show. “I incorporated laser-cut leather and unconventional colours like black, which is a faux pas when it comes to Indian weddings,” she says. The collection was a hit, and Jassal found a new path.Now she has showrooms in Toronto and Los Angeles and has produced five collections, including her Mass Exodus show. Jassal’s work continues to blend her two cultures, and it’s been featured in Vanity Fair and gained red-carpet notice at the BET Awards and Emmy Awards. Her spring/summer 2017 collection, alamārī, takes its name from the Punjabi word for “closet” and is a response to the demand from the South Asian market for variety in evening and formal wear. She’s not the only young designer drawing inspiration from non-Western fashion, which generally skews more modest: Sara Elemary, a Harlem-by-way-of Egypt fashion designer, has garnered attention for her highly covetable harem pants. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment A design by Mani Jassal, whose clothes mix Indian and Canadian sensibilities. (manijassal.com)center_img Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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LIVE – Video stream of the Caribou Recover Public Meeting

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. –  The Province of B.C. will hold a public meeting on Tuesday, April 2, at 5:30 p.m. about the draft Caribou recovery program.The meeting will happen at the Pomeroy Hotel and Conference Centre in Fort St. John.  Energeticcity.ca will be streaming the meeting when it starts at approximately 5:30 p.m.  The meeting will be live streamed below or on our Facebook and Youtube pages.Video is not published or doesn’t exist.last_img

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ITC Chairman Y C Deveshwar passes away after brief illness

first_imgNew Delhi: Noted industry leader and ITC Chairman YC Deveshwar, who transformed the cigarette major into a diversified player with interests in FMCG, hospitality, IT and other sectors, passed away Saturday morning after a brief illness. Deveshwar (72), who stepped down from executive role as chairman and CEO in 2017 but remained as a non-executive chairman, breathed his last at a private hospital in Gurugram. “We deeply mourn the passing away of Y C Deveshwar, Chairman ITC,” ITC Managing Director Sanjiv Puri said in a statement. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraDeveshwar passionately championed the cause for sustainable and inclusive growth and the transformative role businesses could play in creating larger societal value. This vision drove ITC to pursue business models that today support over 6 million livelihoods, many amongst the weakest in society, Puri added. He leaves behind his wife and two children –a son and a daughter. Deveshwar joined ITC in 1968 and was appointed as a director on ITC’s board on April 11, 1984. He rose to become its chief executive and chairman on January 1, 1996. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysOne of the longest serving top executives of a corporate entity in India, he was responsible for transforming ITC from mainly a cigarettes maker into a diversified entity with interests in FMCG, hospitality, paper, agri business and information technology, among others. When Deveshwar took charge at the helm of the company in the mid-1990’s, ITC was confronted with formidable challenges, with diversification efforts either failing or languishing. The company’s revenue was less than Rs 5,200 crore and Profit Before Tax (PBT) stood at Rs 452 crore. In 2017-18, the company posted revenues of Rs 44,329.77 crore and net profit of Rs 11,223.25 crore. “His leadership transformed ITC into a valuable and admired multi business conglomerate with a robust portfolio of front-ranking businesses in FMCG, hotels, paperboards and paper, packaging and agri-business. “His vision to make societal value creation a bedrock of corporate strategy also led ITC to become a global exemplar in sustainability and the only company in the world to be carbon positive, water positive and solid waste positive for over a decade,” Puri said. An alumnus of IIT Delhi and Harvard Business School, Deveshwar had also led Air India as chairman and managing director between 1991 and 1994. When ITC split the role of the Executive Chairman between Chairman and Chief Executive Officer with effect from February 5, 2017 as part of succession planning in the company, Deveshwar continued as chairman in non-executive capacity and played the role of mentor to the executive management led by Sanjiv Puri. A recipient of Padma Bhushan –one of the highest civilian awards in the country –in 2011, Deveshwar also played his part in nation building, taking up various roles in several institutions. He served as a director on the Central Board of the Reserve Bank of India, as a member of the National Foundation for Corporate Governance and member of the governing body of the National Council of Applied Economic Research. “Inspired by a patriotic fervour, manifest in his clarion call of ‘Lets Put India First’, he led ITC’s strategic thrust to create an exemplary Indian enterprise dedicated to serving national priorities,” Puri said. Well respected by his peers in the industry, YCD, as he was popularly known in corporate circles, was also a past president of CII, besides being on the National Executive Committees of some of India’s premier trade and industry bodies.last_img read more

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Spain boosts Melilla border fence with Morocco with barbed wire

first_imgMADRID – Spain has installed barbed wire on the triple border fence that separates its north African territory of Melilla from Morocco, a key entry point into Europe for illegal migrants.Barbed wire started being placed on the top of several sections of the seven-metre (23-foot) high fence last week to “reinforce security a bit”, a spokesman for government of Melilla said Monday.Barbed wire had been used before in Melilla but was removed from the top of the border fence in 2006 after causing injuries to migrants as they tried to illegally enter the territory. Forty-eight surveillance cameras already watch over the 11-kilometre (seven-mile) long fence which loops around the city until it reaches the Mediterranean coast.At night the fence is lit up along its entire length to help spot migrants trying to enter the Spanish territory, which has 80,000 inhabitants.The Spanish branch of Amnesty International said it was “deeply worried” over the installation of barbed wire on the border fence.“The response of the Spanish government to the migratory pressure is moving away from the respect of the rights of people who try to enter our country and is a serious step backwards,” it said in a statement.About 3,000 migrants tried to scale the border fence between January 1 and September 17, compared to 1,610 during the same period last year, according to Spanish interior ministry figures.Nearly four-fifths, 77.3 percent, were prevented from entering the territory by Spanish and Moroccan security forces.Melilla and Ceuta, another Spanish territory on the north African coast, have the European Union’s only land borders with Africa.last_img read more

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